New Features: Cohorts, Rich Web Push

We’ve released 2 new features today: Cohorts and Rich Web Push.

Cohorts

The Cohorts feature helps you understand the retention pattern of different cohorts over a period of time.

The term “Cohort” refers to a group of people who have similar characteristics Eg. new users using Android devices could be one cohort, new users using iOS devices could be another cohort. WebEngage is able to determine the retention pattern for these different cohorts based on the events performed.

Also Read: Cohort 101: The Easiest Guide to Cohort Analysis (including popular use-cases)

Let’s try to explain this through an example. Digging deeper into our previous example, let’s define our problem statement as “I would like to understand the retention pattern of the new users of my iOS and Android apps acquired on the 10th of October, 2017”. Retention in this case can be defined in a number of ways – “came back and opened the app again”, “came back and did their first purchase”, “came back and signed up for an account” etc. By analyzing the cohort behavior you will be able to understand the % of users you have been able to retain for each of the cohorts on each of the days from from 10th Oct to 16th Oct. If you see that the retention rate for your iOS users is better than Android users, it could mean many things – maybe the marketing being done to target the right kind of users is for some reason better for iOS than Android, maybe the app experience of iOS is better than Android etc.

Let’s take another example and see how WebEngage will help you understand the retention patterns. Let’s say you want to analyze the retention pattern of new users from different OS. Let’s define retention here as “came back and did any event”. On the WebEngage dashboard, you’ll see 2 fields “First Event” and “Return Event”. In this case, the “First Event” will be “New users” and the “Return Event” will be “Any event”. Since we’re trying to understand the retention pattern by different OS, we’ll specify the split to be “OS Name”.

As you can see above, the retention patterns for users on Windows is much better than that of other OS. This could be because of a number of different reasons – maybe the user experience on Windows is much better than the other operating systems, or maybe the marketing campaigns being run are targeting the right kind of Windows users etc. The Cohorts feature helps you identify such patterns, understand problematic cohorts and empower you with data to delve deeper into the problem and fix it.

You can also drill down into any of cohorts above to analyze day wise cohorts. Let’s say you’d like to analyze the Android cohort to see the day wise sub-cohorts of this Android cohort. You can do so by expanding the Android row above.

Rich Web Push

For any Web Push campaign you create on WebEngage, you will now be able to attach a large image and buttons to each Web Push that goes out through WebEngage. 

Therefore, in addition to sending Web Push notifications like this: 


You will now also be able to send Web Push notifications with buttons like this:

And also Web Push notifications with large image and buttons like this:

Please also take note of the following limitations for the Rich Web Push notifications:

  • Firefox does not support either of these features
  • Images are supported by Chrome version 56 and above only
  • Buttons are supported by Chrome version 48 and above only
  • On Mac Chrome versions 55 and below and 58 and above, you won’t be able to see the image at all. Buttons can be viewed by clicking on the “More” item in the menu
  • On Windows Chrome, you will be able see both the image and the buttons

Try out our new features and tell us what you think of them! Or request a demo from our Success team to learn more about this feature.

Comments are closed.